Journal Article: Investigating more powerful discrimination tests with consumers: effects of memory and response bias (2002)

Abstract:
Two experiments were conducted to investigate the sensitivity of four discrimination methods when they were performed by consumers. In Experiment I, the influence of memory in the duo-trio method was studied. Three versions of the duo-trio method with different memory requirements were considered. Calculated d0 values indicated a higher sensitivity for the duo-trio with the reference tasted between the two test samples (DTM), illustrating the importance of memory in sensory discrimination testing. In Experiment 2, four discrimination tests were compared: the triangle, the DTM, the same–different and the dual-pair tests. The dualpair test was predicted to increase the d0 value of the same–different test by eliminating the large response bias variations between consumers. Results indicated no significant differences in d0 among the protocols. Thus the dual-pair method was not able to improve the sample discrimination ability of the same–different test.

This article appears as:
Rousseau, B., Stroh, S., and O'Mahony, M. (2002). Investigating more powerful discrimination tests with consumers: effects of memory and response bias. Food Quality and Preference, 13(1), 39-45.

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